Society

Covid-19 Pill Treatment

With more and more people being vaccinated everyday, there have been many more treatments to ensure everyone is as safe as possible. For example, the Covid 19 booster shots were meant to prolong immunity. Merck, a pharmaceutical firm has announced that it is currently working on an antivirus pill. This specific pill is predicted to cut both Covid 19 related hospitalizations and deaths by half. Nature.com states, “if the drug candidate, molnupiravir, is authorized by regulators, it would be the first oral antiviral treatment for COVID-19. By contrast, the other currently authorized drugs must be delivered intravenously or injected.”

The pill could lower the number of hospitalization cases because it will provide immunity first of all, and it will also keep areas with low vaccination rates healthy. “A pill could make treating patients earlier on in their infection much easier — and more effective. It could also keep hospitals from overflowing, especially in places where vaccination rates are still low, such as many low- and lower-middle-income countries. Molnupiravir was so effective in a phase 3 trial involving COVID-19-positive people at risk of severe illness that clinicians halted enrolment early.”

9 Things You Need To Know About the New COVID-19 Pill > News > Yale Medicine

Despite the large amount of benefits that come from the pill treatment, getting there is another matter. “Even if lower-income countries can afford the medicine, they might not have the diagnostic capacity to treat patients with molnupiravir early in the course of their illness, when treatment could make a difference.

This week, two Indian drugmakers independently testing generic molnupiravir in people with moderate illness due to COVID-19 sought to end their trials because they saw no “significant efficacy” for the experimental drug, although they plan to continue trials for people with mild illness.” But despite it’s long development, the pill treatment is sure to impact the community positively because of it’s easy accessibility and consistency.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-02783-1

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